Category Archives: smartknitkids

Back To School Sensory Kit Giveaway!

Don’t worry Moms and Dads of Sensory Sensitive Kids!  SmartKnitKIDS has just what you need for Back to School time.  Many moms and dads dread BTS time because they know it means a struggle to get their kids out the door in the morning for school.  And once you get your kiddo there, it’s a struggle for the teacher in keeping them focused and ready to learn.

That’s why we assembled this amazing BTS kit from several of our favorite sensory items we’ve come across in talking with occupational therapists and parents of sensory kids.  We have one kit for one lucky winner!  You can enter to win anytime between right now and the end of our sale on August 15 at 11:59 pm.  Enter by subscribing to our email list; commenting on any of our posts about the giveaway; visiting our SmartKnitKIDS facebook page or following @smartknitkids on Twitter.  It’s just that simple.

ENTER HERE

But, if you’re not the lucky winner, don’t despair.  We’ve made it very easy for you to order your own Back to School Sensory Kit.  Follow the links below to purchase each piece from our website www.smartknit.com or from our friends at Amazon!

$25 SmartKnit Gift Card

We love to make our amazing seamless socks, undergarments and compresso-t products part of every giveaway we do.  But, we know that size, style, color preferences, sensitivity and even needs vary from each individual kid, that’s why we don’t include any specific product as part of our giveaway.  Instead,  we always include an e-gift card that can be used to purchase any of our seamless products from www.smartknit.com.  You get $25 that can be used to buy whatever you need most.

Bouncy Chair Fidget

Bouncy-Chair-Fidget-1

This is a top fidget for kids with ADHD, Autism and Sensory Processing Disorder.  This specialized elastic band easily attaches to child’s chair and offers kids a change in environment needed to help them focus and be ready to learn.  The chair fidget is heavy duty and can withstand frequent kicking.  Another great feature is that it is silent – perfect for the classroom since it doesn’t cause noisy distractions.

Marble Fidget

Marble-Fidget

This small, handheld fidget is the perfect tool to help children that need to keep their hands occupied.  It is great for kids that tend to have desk distractions like pen clicking or pencil tapping.  Marble Fidgets are heavy duty and can withstand lots of “abuse” from active kiddos.  But, if it does break, no need to worry.  It comes with a guarantee!

Desk Buddy Textured Chewable Ruler

Desk-Buddy

Here’s another great fidget for your child to keep at his or her desk.  It was engineered by a team of occupational therapists and teachers.  Lay it at the top of your child’s desk and if the need arises, they can touch the sensory bar.  Several different textures will keep fingers happy!  And, it is made of FDA-approved material that is safe to chew on.  But, don’t worry if your child likes to put this item in their mouth.  It’s naturally bacteria resistant and dishwasher safe.

Lavender Scented Calming Putty

Scented-Putty-1

This therapeutic calming putty gives a multi-sensory experience.  It provides a calming touch and smell, as well as working the hand muscles.  Children can twist and squeeze the putty, which helps build arm and hand muscles.  Lavender is known for its soothing qualities and then scent from this lavender putty can have a calming influence on a child or even promote sleep if used near bedtime or naptime.  Made of silicone, it is safe for children ages 4 and up.  Free of gluten, casein, latex and soy.

Raising a Sensory Smart Child by Lindsey Biel and Nancy Peske

Raising-A-Sensory-Smart-Child

We love this book at SmartKnitKIDS.  It has definitely helped us to better understand a child with Sensory Processing Disorder.  It is a winner of the NAPPA Gold Award and iParenting Media Award.  The best thing about this book is that it helps parents learn how to advocate for their children at school and to empower their children in the world.

I’m Not Weird, I Have Sensory Processing Disorder by Chynna Laird

I'm-Not-Weird

This children’s book is told from the SPD child’s perspective and is a great tool for helping to explain SPD to other children.  It is truly a perfect addition to a classroom that has an SPD kid.  The book was inspired by the author’s own daughter.

Other Great Sensory Items that We Love

Net Therapy Indoor Swing

Net-Therapy-Swing

Sensory Chewable Droplet Pendant

Chew-Pendant

Hypnotic Liquid Motion Spiral Timer Toy

Sensory-Timer-Toy

Cozy Canoe for Sensory Diet

Cozy-Canoe

Body Sock Sensory Sack

Body-Sock

And more!

Don’t forget to enter our contest to win your own Back to School Sensory Kit!

ENTER HERE

 

Autism FAQs

Since April is Autism Awareness Month, SmartKnitKIDS wants to help bring awareness to Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders.princewilliamcountypublicschools

from princewilliamcountypublicschools.com

 

What are Autism Spectrum Disorders and Autism?

Autism Spectrum Disorders are a range of brain disorders that are characterized by restricted patterns of behavior and impairments in social communication and interactions.  Symptoms can vary drastically from individual to individual in both number and severity, but typically share similar features and origins.

speech211

from speechbudy.com

 

What is autistic disorder?

Autistic disorder is the most common Autism Spectrum Disorder and is commonly referred to as autism.  Autism severely impairs a child’s social interaction and ability to communicate.

What is Asperger’s Syndrome?

Asperger’s Syndrome is a milder form of autism and is the second most common ASD.  Children with Asperger’s Syndrome exhibit a higher language development than children with autism.  Many of them will have normal intellectual ability, but have a disinterest in social communication.

What are the other Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Although Autism and Asperger’s are more known, there are other named disorders on the spectrum.  One is Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified or PDDNOS. Children with PDDNOS demonstrate some of the symptoms similar to autism disorder, but do not meet all the criteria of autism.  Another more rare disorder is Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD). This one affects more boys than girls. Children with this disorder develop normally for approximately two years and then regress in most areas and continue to regress beginning around age 3 or 4.  They experience a pronounced loss in motor, language, social and intellectual skills, as well as loss of bowel and bladder control. They may also experience seizures. Rett syndrome is a genetic disorder in which autistic symptoms begin to develop between 6 and 18 months of age, after early normal development.  Rett syndrome affects females almost exclusively. Those with Rett syndrome typically begin to shun social contact, cease talking, have unique motor behaviors and regress in skills.  The cause of Rett syndrome has been identified as a single gene mutation.

What are the symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Symptoms can range from mild to severe.  They can appear gradually or suddenly. Most symptoms will become noticeable by the age of 3, but can be observed as early as birth.  Symptoms can include:

  •  Social Deficits – Social interactions are difficult for children with autism.  They may avoid eye contact. They may avoid interactions with people.  They often have difficulty reading social cues. They may have difficulty controlling emotions, can be disruptive or aggressive.  They may lose control easily when frustrated or uncomfortable.
  •  Communication Difficulties – Communication difficulties vary from child to child.  Some children with autism may have very good language skills, but have difficulty in initiating or sustaining conversations.  Other children may have language delays or regression in language development. Other children may be mute, while others still will have unusual use of language, such as repeating a phrase or parroting.  Children with autism may also have difficulty with body language. Their facial expressions, tone and gestures may not match the verbal content or emotions.
  •  Repetitive Behavior – Many children with autism, or even adults for that matter, insist on consistency.  They will have difficulty with any change, however minor, with their routines. They may exhibit repetitive motions like arm-flapping, freezing, rocking back and forth or walking on their toes.  They may become intensely preoccupied with any certain topic. Or can spend long periods of time arranging toys rather than playing with them.
  •  Sensory Difficulties – Although, children may exhibit Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) without being on the spectrum, many children on the spectrum do exhibit Sensory Processing Disorder.  This is when the brain is unable to balance the senses appropriately. Children with this disorder can be hyper-sensitive or hypo-sensitive to sounds, textures, tastes or smells.  Children may have difficulty with crowds due to the over-stimulus of noise. Many children with SPD and autism have difficulty with tags or seams in their clothes. What may not be noticed at all or even a minor annoyance to some, will feel extremely uncomfortable to children with SPD.  SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks and undergarments can help many of these children.
  •  Unusual Abilities – Some children with ASD can display truly remarkable abilities.  These can include artistic talents, musical abilities without training, or the ability to memorize difficult lists of information.

Who develops autism spectrum disorders?

Autism Spectrum Disorders are three to four times more common in boys than in girls.  However, girls with an ASD tend to have more severe symptoms. Autism touches people of all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups,

What are the causes of Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Most researchers believe that it is a combination of genetic, biological and environmental factors that cause ASD.  They are exploring genes which they believe contribute to the development of ASD. Abnormal brain development during the first months of life is being studied.  Researchers hope to determine if structural abnormalities may be caused by genetic and/or environmental factors.

How Did My Child Develop Autism?

Researchers are learning more about autism every day, but we still have a lot to learn.  Research does suggest that the development of autism happens in the very early brain development.  Researchers have identified several genes that can cause autism, but these genes only account for 15% of autism cases.  They have also identified more than 100 different genes or gene mutations that can increase a child’s risk of developing autism. But, most researchers believe it is not genes alone that can cause a child to develop autism.  Many scientists believe that it is a combination of genetics and environment, or non-genetic factors. Some environmental factors that increase the likelihood of autism include: advanced parental age at time of conception; prematurity with very low birth weight; maternal diabetes; infection during pregnancy; and certain birth complications, including those that may involve oxygen deprivation to a baby’s brain.  Although researchers are closer than ever to understanding why a child develops autism, this is still a medical frontier. The organization Autism Speaks funds a multitude of studies working towards discovering the causes of autism.

Are Vaccines the Cause?

Researchers have spent two decades extensively looking for any link between childhood vaccinations and autism.  They have had very clear results. Vaccines do not cause autism.

How are Autism Spectrum Disorders diagnosed?

Currently, there is no diagnostic test to detect autism.  But, scientists are hopeful that with more research a diagnostic test may be available in the future.  For now, diagnosis comes from various screening instruments, as well as parental input. These tools are able to measure the prevalence of symptoms of autism.  A child may display symptoms right away or it can occur after several months of normal development. Some of the things to look for in children between 18 months and 3 years include:

  •         Limited pretend play
  •         Lack of pointing to demonstrate interest
  •         Reduced gaze following
  •         Less frequent demonstration of repetitive, stereotypic behaviors
  •         In children with autism between 2 years and 3 years of age, the following features may be observed:  
  •         Communication difficulties
  •         Socialization deficits with caregivers
  •         Perceptual sensitivity
  •         Other difficult behaviors

How are Autism Spectrum Disorders typically treated?

Every person with autism or an autism spectrum disorder is different.  Because of that, there is no exact treatment for it. However, the best outcomes come from the earliest interventions. There are many different methods that might be used depending on each individual.  They can include medications, behavioral therapy, psycho-education, family support groups, educational interventions, speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and specialized training.

How Common is Autism?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identify that 1 in every 68 American children has an Autism Spectrum Disorder.  While this is a 10-fold increase over the last 40 years, much of the increase is due to improved diagnosis and awareness. ASD affects more than 2 million people in the US and tens of millions worlwide.

What Should I Do if I Suspect Something is Wrong with My Child?

Early intervention has been shown to provide children with autism the best chance for improving function and maximizing progress.  Talk to your child’s doctor right away. Also, you can contact your state’s Early Intervention Services to have your child screened.

How Do I Get My Child the Help He or She Needs?

A great resource for finding the right professionals is the Autism Treatment Network from Autism Speaks.  The ATN is a network of hospitals, physicians, researchers and families at 17 locations across the US and Canada.  The clinicians at ATN work together to develop the most effective approach to medical care for children and adolescents affected by autism.

What if I Suspect that I Have Autism?

This is possible.  Researchers are learning more and more about autism, but there is so much that is still unknown.  A greater knowledge in identifying autism has lead to a greater prevalence in diagnosis. But, many adults that have Asperger’s Syndrome or other high-functioning forms of autism never received a diagnosis as a child. They only come to a diagnosis when they seek help for problems they have at work or in their social lives.  If you suspect that you may have an Autism Spectrum Disorder, a licensed clinical psychologist, neurologist or psychiatrist can evaluate you and make a diagnosis.

How Do I Deal with this Diagnosis?

When a parent receives a diagnosis that their child has an Autism Spectrum Disorder it can be confusing and emotional.  But, the very best way to move forward for you and your child is to educate yourself. Early intervention has had really great results, and it is important to find out all you can to make sure you take advantage of all the resources available to your child.  Take advantage of resources yourself, too. There are many great online communities or local organizations to obtain advice from other parents.

Will My Child Be Able to Attend School?

Of course!  It is your child’s right to attend school according to the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1990.  The Act says that every child deserves access to a “free and appropriate” education funded by the government, whether is is in a mainstream classroom or special education.

asanv.org

from asanv.org

 
** Sources for the content of this blog include The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation and Autism Speaks.

Splitting Seams . . . Again

True SmartKnitKIDS pros out there know about the amazing differences between our seamless socks and other socks that claim to be seamless.  But, we know there are some rookies out there, too, so we thought it was about time for a quick refresher on the seamless playbook – just in time for Back to School shopping!

There is more than one way to knit a sock!  Truly.  But, most don’t claim to be seamless.  Of the ones that do, some of them are just that – a claim.  Let’s break them down.

Smooth or Hand-linked Seams

First up is a smooth or hand-linked seam.  This sock really does have a seam even though the seam is a lot more comfortable than regular sock seams.  The seam is created by linking together both sides of the sock to fuse together the toe of the sock.  The process is done very carefully to ensure that the resulting seam is as flat as possible.  But, the most seam-sensitive among us can still feel that pesky seam.  It’s not truly seamless.

HandLinkedSeams-1
This is an example of a handlinked seam.  Notice you can still see the seam line on the toe.
HandLinkedSeams-Hand-2 Here is the handlinked seam turned inside out.  It is better than a traditional sock, but still has a seam line.

SmoothSeams-1

Here is an example of a smooth seam.  It is very faint, but you can still make out the seam line.

SmoothSeams-Hand-2

And this is what your toes would feel.  This is the inside of a sock with smooth seams.

Truly Seamless

To make a sock that is truly seamless you have to start at the toe.  Then there is nothing to sew or fuse together.  No seams!  SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks are knitted by starting at the toe and working up from there.  It’s just like a caterpillar knitting a cocoon.  No seam means no irritation.

TrulySeamless-1

This is one of our SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks.  See how there is no irritating seam anywhere in the toe of the sock.

TrulySeamless-Hand-2

This is the same sock turned inside out.  Again, it is easy to see that SmartKnitKIDS socks are truly seamless.
SeamComparison2
The difference between the seam types is clear when side by side.

Pressing Line

So some parents tell us that their child can still feel a “seam” on our SmartKnitKIDS socks.  Are they feeling a seam on our seamless socks?  The answer is no, although they may think they’re feeling one.  Why?  Because of what we call the pressing line.  The pressing line is something that occurs in the “finishing” process of our socks.  After the socks are knitted, they are pressed to give them a finished look.  To some children, this line can feel like a seam and can be irritating.  But, it can be easily washed out.  It may take a few times through the wash, but a pressing line should diminish.

PressingLine

This sock is also a SmartKnitKIDS sock, but see how there is a very faint line around the toe.  This sock has gone through the finishing process and has been pressed.

PressingLine-Magnified

Here is a close up of the pressing line.  As it sometimes resembles a seam, some people mistake it for a seam.

Cuff Only on Small and Medium

Okay, one more item for discussion.  Many of our customers have noticed that the Smalls and Mediums have a woven cuff, but the larger sizes do not.  Why is this?  The main reason for this is due to the very small size of these two smallest socks, they require a little more special care in making them resulting in the cuff.  The added bonus is that smaller children tend to have more trouble keeping their socks pulled up and the extra cuff helps with that.

Cuff-1

This is the size difference between a small and an x-large.  Notice how the small has a cuff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bugsley Bucks for Autism Awareness Month

Nearly 25 years ago, the Autism Society designated the month of April as Autism Awareness Month.  What they began was a nationwide effort to promote autism awareness, inclusion and self-determination for all.  Today, the prevalence of autism is 1 in every 88 American children.

SmartKnitKIDS works every day in manufacturing products that help children with sensory differences. Many children with autism also have these sensory issues and therefore, irritations like clothing seams can feel like big irritations to these kids.  SmartKnitKIDS socks are seamless, leaving nothing to irritate sensitive feet and toes.  The form-fitting design gives children’s feet a gentle “hug”, which provides closeness and gentle pressure that are soothing to children.  SmartKnitKIDS uses this same technology and design in a host of other products for kids with sensory issues, including Big Kids SocksKids UndiesCompresso T, and Bralette.

SmartKnitKIDS believes in spreading awareness of the condition, as well as celebrating the amazing individuals that live with autism daily. To celebrate these great kiddos, we are offering one amazing deal on SmartKnitKIDS and Big Kids products.  For any purchases made in the month of April that are at least $25*, SmartKnit will send you a Bugsley Bucks card in your order.  The Bugsley Bucks cards will then work like cash on a single purchase made between May 1 and June 15.

$25 – $49.99 Spent = $5 in Bugsley Bucks
$50 – $74.99 Spent = $10 in Bugsley Bucks
$75 – $99.99 Spent = $15 in Bugsley Bucks
$100 – $124.99 Spent = $20 in Bugsley Bucks
$125+ Spent = $25 in Bugsley Bucks

And we haven’t forgotten about those ordering small amounts either.  Any order under $25 will receive 10% off at checkout!

So, this April, we encourage you to do something to raise awareness for autism.  Wear blue. Put a blue light on your front porch. Participate in a local autism event. And don’t forget to order your SmartKnitKIDS products for extra Bugsley Bucks!!

* Subtotal must reach $25.  Tax and shipping are not included.  See www.smartknit.com/rewards for more details.

 

 

 

 

Splitting Seams and Other Important Facts about SmartKnitKIDS Socks

So what is the scoop about all these socks out there claiming to be seamless?  As parents of seam-sensitive children know, they are not all alike.  Let’s get down to the nitty gritty of what all these different “seamless” socks are all about.

Smooth and Handlinked Seams

Both of these types of seams are created by linking together both sides of the sock to fuse together the toe of the sock.  The process is done very carefully to ensure that the resulting seam is as flat as possible.  As you can imagine, this is better than a traditional sock seam, but it really isn’t seamless, despite the claims to the contrary.  As it isn’t truly seamless, it can still cause some discomfort and irritation, especially in seam-sensitive children.  Sometimes it is recommended to turn these socks inside out so that the child wears the sock with the seam on the outside.  This may work for some sensitive children, but many of them find that the “ridge” from the seam is still irritating – regardless of how small or which side of the sock it is on.

 HandLinkedSeams-1
This is an example of a handlinked seam.  Notice you can still see the seam line on the toe.
HandLinkedSeams-Hand-2 Here is the handlinked seam turned inside out.  It is better than a traditional sock, but still has a seam line.

SmoothSeams-1

Here is an example of a smooth seam.  It is very faint, but you can still make out the seam line.

SmoothSeams-Hand-2

And this is what your toes would feel.  This is the inside of a sock with smooth seams.

 

Truly Seamless

To make a sock that is truly seamless you have to start at the toe.  Then there is nothing to sew or fuse together.  No seams!  SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks are knitted by starting at the toe and working up from there.  It’s just like a caterpillar knitting a cocoon.  No seam means no irritation.

TrulySeamless-1

This is one of our SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks.  See how there is no irritating seam anywhere in the toe of the sock.

TrulySeamless-Hand-2

This is the same sock turned inside out.  Again, it is easy to see that SmartKnitKIDS socks are truly seamless.
SeamComparison2
The difference between the seam types is clear when side by side.

 

Pressing Line

So some parents tell us that their child can still feel a “seam” on our SmartKnitKIDS socks.  What is this all about?  Because of the way the socks are knitted, a seam is just not possible.  What are they feeling then?  This is something that occurs in the “finishing” process of our socks.  We’ve told you about how they’re knitted, but after that the socks are pressed to give them a finished look.  Some children can feel this line and are bothered by it.  But, since this is just a pressing line, it can easily be washed out.   It might take one or two washes, but pressing line should diminish.

PressingLine

This sock is also a SmartKnitKIDS sock, but see how there is a very faint line around the toe.  This sock has gone through the finishing process and has been pressed.

PressingLine-Magnified

Here is a close up of the pressing line.  As it sometimes resembles a seam, some people mistake it for a seam.

 

Cuff Only on Small and Medium

Many of our customers have noticed that the Smalls and Mediums have a woven cuff, but the larger sizes do not.  Why is this?  The main reason for this is due to the very small size of these two smallest socks, they require a little more special care in making them resulting in the cuff.  The added bonus is that smaller children tend to have more trouble keeping their socks pulled up and the extra cuff helps with that.

Cuff-1

This is the size difference between a small and an x-large.  Notice how the small has a cuff.

 

Length and AFO Socks

Many parents buy the SmartKnitKIDS socks for their children to wear with AFO braces, but SmartKnit recommends the SmartKnit AFO socks for these instead.  They can be found at this link.  The SmartKnit AFO socks are made the same way (cocoon-style) as SmartKnitKIDS socks, but the specifications are made to specifically fit the length requirements for AFO braces.  Our AFO socks have many more size options to accommodate different widths and lengths, which is important when wearing under an orthosis.  Always check with your provider on the correct size to ensure the orthosis fits properly.

AFOvsSKK-Length-1

The AFO sock is in the middle in purple.  On the left side is a SmartKnitKIDS sock, size x-large.  To the right is a SmartKnitKIDS sock, size 2x-large.  Notice how the AFO sock and the 2XL sock are roughly the same length, but the AFO sock is much narrower.  It is designed to be worn under a brace.

 

Sizing

Another question that we get asked a lot is how the sizing works.  This is also unique.  SmartKnitKIDS socks don’t have heels.  Because there is no part of the sock that is defined for the foot, each sock size can easily be worn by many different sized feet.  Here’s how to figure out what size you need. Step 1: Determine which length your child desires (ankle, crew or knee high) and find it on the chart below.  Step 2: Find your child’s shoe size under the correct length heading.  Step 3: Find your child’s SmartKnitKIDS sock size to the left.  It’s that simple!

smartknitkids_charts

smartknitkids_seamless_socks_size_chart_2.11.16

Now that’s the skinny on all the ins and outs of SmartKnitKIDS socks!  Here’s to seam free days for all!

Image

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!!

dr-seuss_SKK

Groundhog Day

groundhog_day (1)
Do you ever feel like you’re living in Groundhog Day?  You know the movie from the early 90s starring Bill Murray where he continually relives the same day, February 2, Groundhog Day?  Your version probably consists of mornings battling your sensitive child to put socks on.  Then you have to adjust the socks, and adjust them again, and then again and again.  Finally, all the lumps and bumps are smoothed away and the seams are in just the right spot.  Once you have the socks just right, you now have the challenge of getting his shoes on without disturbing your hard work adjusting the socks.  If they move, you’re back to square one.  And that’s only Monday.  And Tuesday.  And Wednesday.  You get the idea.  Your own version of Groundhog Day.

In the movie, Bill Murray’s character eventually breaks the cycle and wakes up on February 3, the next day, a new and different day.  It’s time that your family breaks the cycle, too, so you can move on to a new day – one without the morning sock battle.

SmartKnitKIDS socks are a great way to cure the lumps, bumps and seams for good.  Our kids’ socks feature truly seamless construction, knitted like a cocoon from the toe up.  So, there’s no need for seams, or lines or bumps or any of those annoying things.  Our socks feature Halo Top™ which is comfortable and non-binding and helps keep the socks in place without making indentations.  The yarns used in SmartKnitKIDS socks are made with high tech fibers to wick moisture away from the skin and preventing stinky feet.

These socks may make the difference between living in Groundhog Day or waking up tomorrow knowing that it’s a new day!