Springing into Spring with a Sensory Sensitive Child

Spring is in the air and to many people, that is welcome news!  But parents of children with Sensory Processing Disorder, that is not always the case.  There are a lot of reasons that make spring a little difficult for these children.

Allergies

Oh yes, allergies.  While nasal congestion, sneezing and itchy, watery eyes can be annoying to most people that suffer from them, for a child with Sensory Processing Disorder, allergies are even worse.  When a child is hypersensitive to sensory input, a body’s reaction to allergens can be intolerable.

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Photo courtesy of fda.org

Many people think there is precious little you can do to prevent allergies, but there are actually a lot of things that can be done to help any allergy sufferer.  If your sensory sensitive child has a difficult time managing seasonal allergies you may want to try HEPA air filters, as well as a HEPA vacuum cleaner.  A HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter, can trap pollens, dander and other allergens.  Another way to keep allergens out of the house is to wash window screens, or better yet, resist the urge to open them up.  An allergy sufferer should also wash their hair and body at the end of each day to wash away the pollens before going to bed.  Wash clothing items that are typically not washed as often (like shoes or jackets) more often.  Finally, if you child will tolerate it, use a saline rinse to clear nasal passages of allergens.

Weather

The changes in weather and temperature from cold, dry winter to a warm/cool, wet and budding spring can really affect the senses.  The scents of grass and trees budding and the cleansing rain washing away the winter might be a great sensation to most of us, but the change can be overwhelming to the sensory sensitive kid.

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Photo courtesy of farmersalmanac.com

There isn’t a whole lot that can be done to change the weather.  The spring weather is coming sooner or later.  You can help your child to “warm up” to the weather changes by talking about them ahead of time.  “I’m looking forward to the sweet smell of the trees and flowers budding,” you might try.  Or, “the spring rain is nature’s way of giving the earth a bath.  It will feel so good.”

Clothing

I don’t know about you, but changing out the winter wardrobe can feel a little strange at first.  Lighter fabrics, shorter sleeves, shoes without socks, and frankly lighter weight clothes all around all can feel so different after the long winter of bundling up.  It can take a little time transitioning, especially for someone that has sensory challenges.

The easiest thing you can do to help your child transition to spring clothes is to make sure and wash them all beforehand.  New things may be scratchy and older things may need to be freshened up after sitting in the closet all winter.  Make sure everything fits properly.  If your kiddo has grown enough, old things may be a little tight, which might be uncomfortable to your child.  Make sure to avoid clothing with scratchy tags, elastic waistbands or cuffs and annoying seams.  SmartKnitKIDS seamless undies and socks feel great against the skin.

Daylight Savings Time

Many children thrive on routine and when that routine is disrupted just a little bit (looking at you, Daylight Savings Time), it can wreck havoc on the whole family.  A sensory sensitive kid may have a tough time coping with the change, especially the spring change when everything gets a little earlier.

Well, we’re a little late to the game on this year’s Daylight Savings Time prep, but it never hurts lay out a good plan for future.  The easiest way to prepare a child for Daylight Savings Time change is to gradually move bedtime back by several minutes each day by several days in advance.  The gradual change will be less taxing on the child’s internal clock making the time change easier.

With a little bit of preparation, even your most sensory sensitive child can successfully navigate their way into spring.

Pets for Kids with Autism

February 20 is National Love Your Pet Day! Pets can be an amazing thing for children with autism, sensory disorders or any number of other special needs.  Animal therapy has increased in recent years to treat a multitude of health conditions, such as cancer, epilepsy, heart disease, emotional and behavioral disorders and chronic pain.  It seems only logical that someone would study the effects of animal therapy on children with autism.

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In 2014, the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine did just that.  MU’s Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction found that autistic kids who have a family pet at home have more advanced social skills and are more assertive and communicative than autistic kids without pets.

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Dr. Gretchen Carlisle, the lead author, and her team, studied 70 families who have children that are patients at the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders.  While most of the families had dogs, several had a variety of other animals including fish, farm animals, rabbits, reptiles, birds and even a spider.

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Dr. Carlisle’s data showed that children who live in homes that include pets were more likely to introduce themselves, ask questions and respond to other people’s questions – all things that can be difficult for children with autism.  The researchers felt that the pets helped to provide an opportunity for the children to interact with others without realizing they were doing it.

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But, Dr. Carlisle cautions that finding the right animal is key and is also different for each autistic child.  Dogs typically are the most common pets, especially for children, due to their energy, affection and playfulness.  But, for a child with a sensitivity to noise, a barking dog may not be the best option.  Cats can be great for a child like this – or rabbits, gerbils, etc.  It’s important to match your child’s needs and personality to a pet that he or she can really bond with.  There are a number of animals that can make really great pets: guinea pigs, iguanas, farm animals (as long as you live in the proper environment for them.)  Remember, someone in this study actually had a spider!

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There are several other studies that conclude that owning a pet can really be beneficial to most people.  Bonding with a pet has been shown to encourage empathy towards other humans.  Pets have been shown to help reduce stress and anxiety, blood pressure and heart rate and can even help children and adults to gain independence that they wouldn’t otherwise have.

There are so many reasons to love your pets and the benefits that they have for autistic kids are just a few of those reasons.  Give your furry friends some extra love this Tuesday . . . or maybe some of their favorite treats!

The information for this blog post came from the following articles.  Read more at the links below:

https://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/autism-and-pets-more-evidence-social-benefits
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/pets-help-autistic-kids-advance-social-skills/

https://munews.missouri.edu/news-releases/2014/1230-children-with-autism-who-live-with-pets-are-more-assertive/

https://blog.brainbalancecenters.com/2014/09/benefits-pet-ownership-children-special-needs

** Photos are from bhmpics.com; copperpointresort.com; dailymail.co.uk and foodexposed.co.za

 

 

Surviving Winter with an SPD Kid

Winter!  It’s a tough season for all of us, but especially parents of sensory sensitive kids.  Your concern for your kids shifts back and forth between keeping them warm and managing their sensitivities.  Every kid is different, but following a few tips will help you navigate the winter more successfully with your sensitive child.

Wash Everything

At the start of a new season, most parents are pulling out a few old things from last season, but also doing a lot of buying of new things to wear.  Run the old clothes that have been sitting in the back of a closet through the wash to help freshen them up.  But, go ahead and wash all your kid’s new things, too.  Washing new things before wearing them can help loosen and soften them.

Remove Tags

Every sensory parent knows that’s the first thing to do, of course.  Some tags are worse than others and new things may need to be tried and inspected for any extra discomforts.  Don’t forget coats, scarves, hats, gloves, etc.  These are easy to overlook since they go over other clothes, but you never know how something will rub or irritate.

Keep Skin Moisturized

Sometimes sensitive kids can experience even more difficulty when it comes to dry skin.  Be sure to lotion them up every day and use a good chap stick.  It will also help if they’re well hydrated, so make sure they’re drinking plenty of water, too.  Water – not juice or soda!

Prepare them Before the Season

Test your kiddo ahead of time to see what items will bother them.  Bundle them up with anything you would on their coldest day – coat, hat, scarf, gloves.  You’ll have time to find a solution for anything that is irritating.

Hand Warmers

Some children will find gloves uncomfortable and refuse to wear them.  And since SmartKnitKids doesn’t make gloves at present, you’ll need to find something that works to keep their hands warm.  A hand warmer in each pocket may do the trick.

Dress in Layers

Since some kids, try as you might, just will not wear a winter coat, you may have to resort to multiple layers.  You can find several shirts, sweatshirts, hoodies, etc. and add several layers to your kiddo.  Thermal shirts like ones made by athletic gear companies may help, too, since they’re thin and designed to keep you warm.

Keep Extra Clothes at School/Daycare

This extends the idea of dressing in layers.  If you keep an extra layer or two at school, it’s fewer things to keep track of when leaving the house, but can provide a little extra warmth if the child didn’t arrive at school with enough.

Experiment with Different Fabrics

Some children might like the super softness of fleece and others may feel it’s too bulky.  Some might like the sleekness of a thermal shirt, but others may not.  Give you child a choice between certain fabrics that you approve of to create extra warmth.

Socks

Don’t forget our SmartKnitKIDS socks.  Keeping feet warm during the winter is important.  SmartKnitKIDS socks will be more comfortable for sensitive kids because of our super soft, stretchy fabric and no seams.  They also help keep feet dry, which in turn keeps them warmer during the winter.  I like to stick some over my baby’s hands, too, instead of mittens.  They stay on better than baby mittens and they’re nice and comfortable. 😉

Stay positive, moms and dads.  Although it may not feel like it, the warm weather isn’t toooo far off.

Warm Winter Kid-Friendly Comfort Foods

As I drove into the office this morning, the thermostat on my car read -1°.  Like much of the country, Kansas City is currently under a deep freeze.  The best thing about temps this low is warm and delicious comfort foods.  But, some of my favorites are not exactly favorites of kids.  “This chili is too spicy!”  “I don’t like potato soup!”  Grrrr!  What I need are some good kid-friendly recipes that still warm the body during these super chilly winter days.  In my hunt for recipes to match these qualifications, I came across a couple that I can’t wait to try!

The recipe below is a chili recipe that is easy on the spice, which will hopefully get fewer complaints from the kiddos – my little weirdos don’t like spice!

Crock Pot Kid-Friendly Turkey Chili
from www.skinnytaste.com

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Ingredients:
1.3 lbs 99% lean ground turkey
1 teaspoon oil
1 medium onion, minced
1 red bell pepper, finely diced
1 garlic clove, minced
1 ½ cups frozen corn kernels
10 oz. can Rotel Mild Tomatoes
8 oz. can plain tomato sauce
¼ cup low sodium chicken broth
1 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon chili powder
½ teaspoon paprika
½ teaspoon salt
1 bay leaf

Directions:

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, add the turkey. Season with salt and break up with a spatula while cooking.  Cook until no longer pink and add to slow cooker.
  2. Add oil to skillet and sauté the onion, garlic and pepper over medium heat for 4 to 5 minutes.
  3. Add onion, garlic and pepper to the slow cooker and stir in corn and tomatoes, tomato sauce, cumin, chili powder, paprika and salt and mix until well blended.
  4. Pour chicken broth into slow cooker and add bay leaf.
  5. Cover and cook on High for 4 hours or Low for 6 hours.
  6. Serve with desired toppings.

*** We like using frito corn chips and cheese as toppings, but any toppings you typically use will work.

 

Kids love Tater Tot Casserole, right?!  Even moms and dads will appreciate this warm and toasty recipe on a cold day.

Tater Tot Casserole
from www.fromthepod.com

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Ingredients:
1 pound of ground beef
1 can of cream of chicken soup
1 can of diced tomatoes
1 package of frozen tater tots
2 packages of shredded cheese
½ Tbsp salt
2 tsp garlic salt
½ Tbsp pepper

Directions:

  1. In a skillet, add ground beef. Sprinkle salt, pepper, and garlic salt.  Brown until slightly crispy and then add to slow cooker.
  2. Add cream of chicken soup and diced tomatoes and mix.
  3. Arrange tater tots on top.
  4. Cover and cook on Low for 3 hours.
  5. Sprinkle cheese on top and cook for another 30 minutes.

 

Good ole Mac and Cheese is another kid favorite, but I despise the kind in the box with the powder cheese.  I have a couple of tasty and delicious Mac and Cheese recipes that I pull out at home, but they’re more suited to a grown-up taste, so my kiddos turn their noses up to them. (Seriously, these kids are picky.)  But, this recipe is good for everyone – it’s not out of a box, but works well with a child’s palate.

Kid-Friendly Homemade Mac and Cheese
from www.livingwellmom.com

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Ingredients:
16 oz. box elbow macaroni noodles
10 Tbsp butter, divided
1/3 cup flour
3 cups milk
12 oz. cheese
¾ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
4 Tbsp dry bread crumbs

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°.
  2. Cook macaroni noodles and drain.
  3. In a separate saucepan, melt 1 stick (8 Tbsp) butter over medium heat. Stir in flour and slowly add milk, stirring.
  4. Bring to a boil and stir for 2 minutes. Turn off the burner and add cheese, salt and pepper, stirring until the cheese is melted.
  5. Add the macaroni noodles and mix well.
  6. Pour everything into a 2 quart casserole dish.
  7. Melt the additional 2 Tbsp of butter and mix with bread crumbs and a dash of pepper. Sprinkle mixture over the mac and cheese.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes.

 

Corn dogs are another food kids love.  The recipe below is a healthier option – and honestly much tastier than the frozen corn dogs out of a box! J

Baked Corn Dogs
from www.delish.com

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Ingredients:
1 ½ cups flour
2/3 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tsp baking powder
2 tsp sugar
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2/3 cup milk
2 large eggs
2 tsp vegetable oil
4 precooked smoked chicken sausages
Popsicle sticks

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, sugar, ½ tsp salt, ¼ tsp pepper. Make a well in the center and add milk, eggs and oil.  Mix just until combined.
  3. Insert a popsicle stick into one end of each sausage leaving enough for a handle. Dust the sausages with flour and tap off excess. Using the handle, rotate each sausage over the bowl as you spoon batter over it to evenly coat.
  4. Place each “corndog” on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes.
  5. Remove from oven. Use a spatula to reapply batter that has slipped onto sheet.  Return from oven and bake until golden, about 20 minutes.
  6. Serve with desired toppings.

 

This last recipe is one from my own kitchen.  I love it because kids can make them almost by themselves, which is great because it gives them something to do.  It also allows them to make something to their own liking.

Biscuit Mini Pizzas

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Ingredients:
1 package of canned biscuit dough
1 jar of pizza sauce
1 package of shredded cheese
mini pepperonis or any other pizza toppings you enjoy

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Flatten out each of the biscuits expanding them slightly to form the pizza crust and place them on an ungreased cookie sheet.
  3. Spread each “crust” with pizza sauce.
  4. Sprinkle with cheese and add toppings.
  5. Bake until biscuits are golden and cheese is melted – about 8 minutes.

 

Here’s hoping the temperature rises soon.  But, in the meantime, you and your kiddos can stay warm and toasty with these delicious comfort food recipes!

Holiday Travel Tips . . . with Kids!

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Does it feel like this year is flying by?  For me, it does.  I can’t believe it’s already time to start thinking about Thanksgiving travel.   Traveling with children can be a challenge, but seriously people do it every year!  Thanksgiving weekend is known for being THE busiest travel weekend of the whole year.  According to AAA, 48.7 million American travelers are expected this year and you can bet that many of those travelers are children.  So, if the thought of traveling with your young family in just a few short weeks gives you the anxiety that it is giving me right now, you might want to check out the tips below before you go.  They’ll help make your trip a little less stressful.

  1. Plan Ahead– Make a detailed itinerary and make sure your children understand each leg of the journey. Rehearse parts of the trip that may give your children moments of anxiety. Take your child on short, practice runs for car trips, or visit the airport ahead of time. Walk through the airport and point out things to your child and watch some planes take off and land. When travel day arrives, the travel expectations will feel more familiar and comfortable.
  2. Arrive Early for Flights– Planning to arrive at the airport early will ensure that you’ll have time to make adjustments for any travel “roadblocks”. Be sure to bring enough activities to keep your children entertained for any waits or delays that may occur
  3. Create Realistic Expectations– Know what your children can handle and what they will not be able to handle. You may need to add extra stops into your itinerary or perhaps travel over multiple days.
  4. Charge Your Devices– Ensure that all your devices are charged and that you’ve brought extra chargers. You won’t want to be in a jam if the children have used up all the battery playing games just when you need your map app to get you to your next stop.
  5. Pack Plenty of Snacks– Pack plenty of healthy, low-sugar snacks that your children are familiar with and enjoy. You never know when a flight will be delayed or if the next restaurant is not for another 100 miles down the road.  Healthy snacks will help keep kids from getting cranky due to hunger.
  6. Pack Your Sense of Humor– Make the trip fun for you and your kids. Laugh with your kids and tell jokes.  Make up road trip games to play with your kids along the way.  It will make the trip more fun, enjoyable and memorable for you and them.
  7. Bring or Buy Special Needs Foods– If your child has special dietary restrictions, be sure to bring things you know they can eat. Special needs foods may be harder to find if you don’t know the area as well as home.
  8. Discuss the House Rules– Make sure your children know what will be expected of them at all locations – how to behave on a plane or in a hotel or even what special rules Grandma has at her house. Knowing what is expected up front will help them to follow along with your expectations.
  9. Do a Safety Check– Pack a first aid kit. Make sure each child has a proper car seat.  Bring all medications your children are on.
  10. Pack Insurance Cards– Just in case you need to visit a doctor while out of town, be sure to carry your insurance cards with you. It will make the process much easier and you’ll be able to save your concerns for your sick child.
  11. Visit a Local Playground– Help your kids create a memory of their adventure. Visiting a playground while on the road or in Grandma’s hometown will not only give them something fun to remember during your travels, but will also give your kids a chance to burn up some of the energy they’ve accumulated while playing 50 State License Plate Bingo in the backseat.
  12. Keep Your Cool!– There will always be things that happen, whether it be a speeding ticket from the highway patrol or a missed connection during a layover. Take a deep breath and go with the flow.  If you don’t stress things that happen outside of your control, you’ll better enjoy your trip and so will your kids.

Remember at the end of the road is Grandma’s special turkey and dressing or pumpkin pie that you’ve been craving for months – as well as hugs and smiles and family memories.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Splitting Seams . . . Again

True SmartKnitKIDS pros out there know about the amazing differences between our seamless socks and other socks that claim to be seamless.  But, we know there are some rookies out there, too, so we thought it was about time for a quick refresher on the seamless playbook – just in time for Back to School shopping!

There is more than one way to knit a sock!  Truly.  But, most don’t claim to be seamless.  Of the ones that do, some of them are just that – a claim.  Let’s break them down.

Smooth or Hand-linked Seams

First up is a smooth or hand-linked seam.  This sock really does have a seam even though the seam is a lot more comfortable than regular sock seams.  The seam is created by linking together both sides of the sock to fuse together the toe of the sock.  The process is done very carefully to ensure that the resulting seam is as flat as possible.  But, the most seam-sensitive among us can still feel that pesky seam.  It’s not truly seamless.

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This is an example of a handlinked seam.  Notice you can still see the seam line on the toe.
HandLinkedSeams-Hand-2 Here is the handlinked seam turned inside out.  It is better than a traditional sock, but still has a seam line.

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Here is an example of a smooth seam.  It is very faint, but you can still make out the seam line.

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And this is what your toes would feel.  This is the inside of a sock with smooth seams.

Truly Seamless

To make a sock that is truly seamless you have to start at the toe.  Then there is nothing to sew or fuse together.  No seams!  SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks are knitted by starting at the toe and working up from there.  It’s just like a caterpillar knitting a cocoon.  No seam means no irritation.

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This is one of our SmartKnitKIDS seamless socks.  See how there is no irritating seam anywhere in the toe of the sock.

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This is the same sock turned inside out.  Again, it is easy to see that SmartKnitKIDS socks are truly seamless.
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The difference between the seam types is clear when side by side.

Pressing Line

So some parents tell us that their child can still feel a “seam” on our SmartKnitKIDS socks.  Are they feeling a seam on our seamless socks?  The answer is no, although they may think they’re feeling one.  Why?  Because of what we call the pressing line.  The pressing line is something that occurs in the “finishing” process of our socks.  After the socks are knitted, they are pressed to give them a finished look.  To some children, this line can feel like a seam and can be irritating.  But, it can be easily washed out.  It may take a few times through the wash, but a pressing line should diminish.

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This sock is also a SmartKnitKIDS sock, but see how there is a very faint line around the toe.  This sock has gone through the finishing process and has been pressed.

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Here is a close up of the pressing line.  As it sometimes resembles a seam, some people mistake it for a seam.

Cuff Only on Small and Medium

Okay, one more item for discussion.  Many of our customers have noticed that the Smalls and Mediums have a woven cuff, but the larger sizes do not.  Why is this?  The main reason for this is due to the very small size of these two smallest socks, they require a little more special care in making them resulting in the cuff.  The added bonus is that smaller children tend to have more trouble keeping their socks pulled up and the extra cuff helps with that.

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This is the size difference between a small and an x-large.  Notice how the small has a cuff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 Sensational Summer Sensory Activities – 2017 Edition!

Ah summer!  Here you are again and here we are trying to find fun activities to keep the kids engaged.  We pulled out our list of sensory summer activities for this blog, but decided that it would be fun to enhance them a little bit for even more fun sensory summer play.  So, we turned to Google and Pinterest for some expanded ideas.  Below are some of our favorites, as well as the originals, that are both fun and sensory-oriented.

Sand and Water Play

Nothing says summer like sand and water.  Grab some buckets and shovels and head to the beach for some fun and creative tactile input.  But, never fear if you don’t have a beach near your home.  You can recreate the beach with a sand and water table in your backyard.  They don’t take as much sand as a traditional sand box, and can be cleaned out easier so as to not invite an unsanitary environment (think cats, here).  You can also fill the sand and water table with other objects like uncooked rice, beans, noodles or even shaving cream.  At the end of the summer, if the table is cleaned out well, you can bring it inside and fill it with snow!

Alternative Idea

Here’s another option we picked up with a little google search.  Perhaps you need a taste-safe option for a kiddo that may like to sample his sand creations?  The blog A Little Pinch of Perfect has a great recipe for Taste-Safe Kinetic Sand that uses milk powder and vegetable oil.  Make up a little bit of this for your sand table or even use it throughout the winter.  Read the blog for more info and a recipe.

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Play Doh, Gak, Oobleck, Silly Putty

Each of these fun substances offers a different texture sensation to help kids develop normal tactile processing, but also to enhance their creativity and have fun!  You can purchase several of these substances or many of them can be made using recipes found online.  A simple set of cookie cutters, bowls and measuring cups will provide kids with hours of sensory input fun.

Fun Playdough “Ice-Cream Shop” Enhancement

This idea came from A Little Pinch of Perfect again.  Using a little bit of flour with frosting makes a fantastic substance that looks like ice cream, but is a fun and taste-safe sensory playdough.  Kids can play using ice cream cones, cupcake wrappers, sprinkles and candy bits for ice cream shop fun.  And if they decide to taste it, no sweat!  Read more and get the recipe!

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Sensory Scavenger Hunt

Create a scavenger hunt around the yard of different textured items for kids to find.  You can include things to find that are in the grass, mud, flowers and water to give kids a variety of textures.

Sensory Checklist

We love this checklist.  It came from the DoodleCraft blog and is a perfect list of things to find that target different tactile responses.

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Crazy Straws

It’s amazing how much fun kids can have with a straw, but this is such an easy activity.  Just buy a package of colorful and fun crazy straws and let the kids get to work.  They can use their breath to blow different objects around.  It’s also a great way to keep them sipping on water on those hot days!

Pinterest Possibilities

A favorite at our house is a mini boat race.  All you need to do is fill up a small pool with water. (In Scouts, we use rain gutters, but anything that will hold water will work.)  Then let the kids make lightweight boats out of paper or lightweight wood.  (Ours usually come from kits that we get through Cub Scouts, but you can check craft stores or someone handy can help the kids design one.  You can also use all sorts of things around the house to make boats like disposable plastic cups or slices of old pool noodles.  Plain old paper boats work well, too.)

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Water Balloon Fun

Have you ever been to a summer kid-friendly picnic that didn’t have someone pull out a bag of water balloons?  They’re pretty much a given for us.  A fun game for kids that has lasted the test of time is the water balloon toss.  Have two kids stand close together and toss the balloon back and forth trying not to drop it.  Gradually have them move apart and continue to toss the balloon.  Eventually, someone will drop the balloon and get splashed with water.  (Note: Some kids may scare at this at first.  Show them ahead of time what will happen to avoid tears.)

A Whole New Water Balloon World

Oh Pinterest!  Where were you when I was a kid!  Anyway, a quick glance at Pinterest unloads on the amazing creativity all with a little water balloon.  I can’t wait to try the Glow in the Dark Water Balloons, Water Balloon Art and Water Balloon Pinatas.

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Bubbles

Children love bubbles!  Bottles of bubbles are a cheap way to entertain the kids for hours.  Experiment with different sizes and shapes of bubble wands.  Bubble machines are a fun alternative, too.

Fun with Pinterest

Just like all the others, bubbles can also be enhanced by doing a little searching on Pinterest.  We love the idea of Geometric Bubbles for the older kids.  Giant Bubbles and Painting with Bubbles are both on our list of things to try this summer!

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The possibilities are limitless.  We think summer may need to last all year long!